Returning from the blogging desert…

I discreetly upload this bookmark to acknowledge an urge to emerge from the blogging desert. Life events and preoccupations (including computer crashes) have seen this blog vacant for a while. The frantic blogaday of 2011 gave away to blog no day for several months in 2012 – a spectacular promise of fireworks that fizzled out in the rainstorm.
Resurrection is a recurring theme of my life’s vocation, so we’ll see what comes of this. The stats kindly provided by WordPress at the touch of a button reveal a steady flow of traffic on old posts, many of which i had forgotten I had written.
To those kind enough to follow this blog – thank you for your forbearance and patience. I’m working on a return!

Published by wonderingpilgrim

Okay Boomer - that I am. But not one of them know-it-all ones! Still learning that the more I know, the more I have yet to learn. What I do know, however, I know well.

8 thoughts on “Returning from the blogging desert…

  1. Taking a broader view of the variety of blogs I follow, the ebb and flow of different posters is rather welcome. It’s easier for me than to manually subscribe and unsubscribe periodically! I’ve noticed your quietness, but I’m glad you didn’t feel such a slave to the machine so you could have a break. Welcome back, in whatever form it takes.
    Peace,
    Greg.

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  2. Thanks Greg – a sober estimate indeed. Blogging is a reasonably recent phenomenon – a bit different from the old style journaling where one was only accountable to oneself. It is interesting to now note that nagging sense of obligation to others (and perhaps myself) arising from no other source than my own Jiminey Cricket. Yet there it is!

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  3. Dear Wondering Pilgrim, I am proud to be on your post list and to receive your posts which are allways interesting. I have often meant to comment but never did since back then.
    In my line of studies I often wonder how tribes sanctified land in the southern hemisphere. Did they align their settlements to the heavens and did they pace them in specific proportions like they did up here on the northern hemisphere. If so, I wonder, which were their references? Some day I may come to Australia to find out.
    Human evolution is a success story of adaptation. Its decisive moment in time was when genus homo oriented himself on earth, established a basic unity between the proportional size of himself and the size of earth, its distance from the sun, and assimilated his capacity to traversie the surface of earth to a specific time period.
    It would be very intriguing to find ancient edifices or manmade structures, the very reference markers of a Cosmic Image in Australia and specialy if its proportions or distances paced somewhere on the flatlands were aligned to the path of the sun, moon and the stars in proportions I find in ancient settlements in Europe.
    My book, The Measure of the Cosmos, now avalable on Kindle, specifically articulates 6 Cosmic Images in Europe, all measured and aligned in the same way. I expect there are many more, to date I have discovered 14 Cosmic Images in 12 countries in Europe and N. Afrika (www.peturhalldorsson.com). The southern hemisphere awaits further discoveries.

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    1. Petur, good to hear from you again. Thanks for your kind words.
      I recall well your line of fascinating study of the relationship of spacial phenomena and sacred territory. The indigenous of this country, traditionally nomadic and therefore not prone to building permanent structures before European settlement, nevertheless have a very sophisticated means of “mapping the land” that is deeply integrated with mindfulness of the sacred. I suspect you would find much of interest on this side of the equator. All the best in your endeavours.

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  4. So look forward to your return, WonderingPilgrim, though your priorities are, as always, right on the money. Real life comes first.
    Missed you, though. Especially all those translations. The scales fall from the eyes with that sort of thing.

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  5. I echo the other comments. Good to have you around, however infrequent–a fresh and insightful perspective from a different continent. Look after yourself.

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